2009 Fattest Cities: #2 Oklahoma City, OK

  • Fitness Centers & Sport Stores: C+
  • Nutrition: F
  • Sports Participation: C+
  • TV Viewing: F+
  • Overweight/Sedentary: F
  • Junk Food: C-
  • Air Quality: B-
  • Geography: F+
  • Commute: A
  • Parks & Open Space: F+
  • City Rec Facilities: D-
  • Access to Healthcare: A-
  • Motivation: F+
  • Mayor & City Initiatives: C-
  • State Obesity Initiatives: D+
  • What's Good
    The local commute is much easier than in most cities - 64 percent less oppressive than average, leaving more time to exercise and prepare healthy meals. Commuter stress may also raise levels of cortisol, a hormone linked to weight gain and other health problems.

    Oklahoma City locals use stair-climbing machines 25 percent more than average - the 3rd highest rate of any city in our survey.

    What's Not
    According to the CDC, 29 percent of residents in the Oklahoma City area are clinically obese. The national average is 25.19 percent.

    Although other states participate in a CDC-sponsored program to reduce obesity and other chronic diseases, Oklahoma doesn't.

    According to Nielsen Media Research, TV viewers in the Oklahoma City television market spend 13 percent more time in front of the tube than average among cities in our survey.

    The CDC says 44 percent of adults here get either 30 minutes of moderate exercise five or more days a week or 20 minutes of vigorous exercise three or more times per week. In the average city in our survey, 49.6 percent of adults exercise at these levels.

    Oklahoma City residents received a bottom score in fruit and vegetable consumption, with only 17 percent eating the recommended five or more servings per day.

    Health-food stores are rare in Oklahoma City: There's one for every 15,202 residents, nowhere near the national average of one store per 12,118 people.

    Oklahoma City lost points in our Motivation category for poor participation rates in running, biking and walking despite high air quality.

    Basketball courts are practically nonexistent here, among the fewest per capita in our survey. There's just one court here for every 12,162 residents; the national average is one court per 6,909 people.

    Even recreational walking - about the easiest fitness activity anywhere - can't attract participants in Oklahoma City, where people are 14 percent less likely than average to go for a walk, the 4th lowest rate of any city in our survey.

    Just 12 percent of Oklahoma City residents have a health club membership. That's 28 percent less than average, and the 4th lowest rate in our survey.

    Residents of Oklahoma City are 29 percent less likely than average to participate in spinning type cycling classes, the 4th lowest rate of any city in our survey.

    Just 8.4 percent of Oklahoma City residents exercise on stationary cycles. That's 36 percent less than average and the 3rd lowest rate in our survey.

    Residents of Oklahoma City are 86 percent less likely than average to go snowboarding - the 3rd lowest rate in our survey. Even Miami residents snowboard more.

    Oklahoma City residents are 28 percent less likely to participate in fitness walking than average, the 2nd lowest overall participation rate among cities in our survey.

    Back to 2009 Fittest/Fattest Cities

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