Life can be a wild, crazy and often unpredictable ride. Some of the most mundane routines such as your morning commute, a walk on the beach or a day of home improvement can go from stress-free to calamity within seconds. We’ve conjured up some plausible real-life situations that will make you think twice about skipping out on key training moves.
 

1. SOMEONE GETS PINNED UNDER A CAR

The average weight of a car is approximately 4,000 pounds. That’s no easy lift, but with the properly trained muscle groups and some teamwork, you’ve at least got a chance. This year, University of South Florida offensive lineman Danous Estenor lifted a Cadillac off of a 34-year-old tow truck driver. Esternor might stand at a towering 6'3" and weigh 303 pounds, but it’s his training that made him a hero.

Corresponding exercise: Deadlift
Perform 3-5 sets of dead lifts for 6-12 repetitions, with 1-2 minutes rest. Start with lower weight and high reps, progressively increasing the weight and decreasing the repetitions.

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2. ESCAPING FROM UNDER A HEAVY OBJECT

Stuck between a rock and a hard place is not always just a play on words. Getting yourself lodged, pinned or trapped under a falling object can happen. Think about home appliances, furniture, even farm animals. Last month, a New Zealand man was trapped under his horse when he took a tumble during a ride. Luckily, it had just rained giving him soft enough soil to survive. But if he had trained appropriately it could have been his strength, not just dumb luck, that saved his life. Under those circumstances, only a powerful chest and upper body would be enough to muster a slippery escape.

Corresponding exercise: Traditional barbell bench press
Perform 3-5 sets of bench press for 6-12 repetitions and 1-2 minutes rest. Start with lower weight and high reps, progressively increasing the weight and decreasing the repetitions.

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3. CARRYING A BODY

Whether it’s post-tsunami or post-Oktoberfest, it’s not out of the realm of possibility that you might encounter someone either unconscious or unable to move. A big barrel chest won’t be much use here, but with the proper leverage and well-conditioned quads, you stand a chance at achieving superhero status.

Corresponding exercise: Squat, and squat some more
Perform 3-5 sets of squats for 8-15 repetitions and 1-2 minutes rest. Start with lower weight and high reps, progressively increasing the weight and decreasing the repetitions.

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4. FALLING OFF A ROOF

If you can swallow your pride and comfortably admit that your handyman skills hover around Tim "The Tool Man" Taylor level, you’ll agree that trying to fix a hole in the roof could leave you hanging from the gutter. Don’t let a close call result in broken bones or worse, by strengthening those lat and forearm muscles.

Corresponding exercise: Pull-up variations
Some folks can do pull-ups without breaking a sweat, others are not as gifted. Here are pull-up variations for three levels.
For those unable to complete pull-ups: Utilize the assisted pull-up machine to perform 3-5 sets of 10-12 repetitions with one minute rest.
For those able to pull-up: Perform 3-5 sets to muscular failure with 1.5 minutes rest.
For the more elite pull…er, uppers: Try attaching a belt to your waist with additional plates for weight. Perform 3-5 sets to muscular failure with 1.5 minutes rest.

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5. SURVIVE A CROWD-SURFING HEAVYWEIGHT

A heavyset concertgoer diving off stage might not qualify as life-threatening, but it’s definitely enough to make you say, "Oh, shit!" If the crowd’s thick, you won’t be able to make an escape, therefore your next best option is to be prepared so your deltoids don’t buckle.

Corresponding exercise: Shoulder press
Perform 3-5 sets of shoulder press for 6-12 repetitions and 1-2 minutes rest. Start with lower weight and high reps, progressively increasing the weight and decreasing the repetitions.

You can follow Mike on Twitter: @Mike_Simone_MF