Your mind is more powerful than you think. Yes, this sounds ridiculous, but your testosterone responds to a lot of social and psychological forces—including, amazingly, psyching yourself up. According to Emory University neuroendocrinology researcher and former D-I cross-country runner Kathleen Casto, a sport psychophysiologist, “Your T is constantly ebbing and flowing—it doesn’t stay one way. All kinds of social and psychological forces are at play.” 

Casto recommends positive self-talk to boost it in the near term. “Tell yourself, ‘I want to be the best,’ ‘I’m a winner.’ Belief in self and the degree to which you feel you are ‘born for this’ correlates to increased T.” She also suggests “imagining success in a contest against an opponent”—studies show that for some people, anticipating success may boost your T and could even lead to a short-term athletic and mental advantage.

In the meantime, check out 4 hidden testosterone killers you need to avoid, the ultimate T-boosting meal, and read how one man suffering from low levels searched for the answer to whether testosterone-replacement therapy is good or bad.