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Fit Fix: Scientists Debut the First Artificial Human Lung

Plus more of today's top health and science headlines.
Scientists Debut the First Artificial Human Lung

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It's not transplant-ready just yet.

In a landmark breakthrough, researchers working from Galveston, TX have created working human lungs from lung tissue for the first time in medical history. Whether or not the lungs are functional enough to work in a living, breathing human being is a whole other matter, but the development could signal a new era of transplant medicine."Whole-organ engineering is going to work as a solution to the organ donor shortage," Dr. Stephen Badylak, deputy director of the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh told CNN. Patients waiting for organ transplants could one day potentially have their own custom-designed organs grown for them rather than waiting around for some unfortunate organ donor.   [CNN]

The wonders of vitamin C (again).

Along with a dizzying array of other numerous health benefits, including cancer prevention and immune-system boosting, a new study claims the vitamin could also protect you from stroke, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While the exact connection between insufficient vitamin C intake and stroke isn't clear, Dr. Stéphane Vannier, the study's author, suggests the vitamin may help bolster the body by reducing blood pressure and producing collagen. The good news is that eating C-rich foods like oranges, peppers, strawberries, papaya, and broccoli is all it takes to reduce your risk. [MNT]

Foods with Vitamin C: 5 Nutrient-Rich Dishes>>>

Improve your vision with your iPad. 

Practicing visual games 25 minutes a day, four days a week, on a device or computer could greatly improve your vision, a new study says. A research team from the University of California developed a visual-training program and had the university's Riverside baseball team give it a crack. They found that seven of the ballplayers were able to read at three times the distance of normal humans, and greatly improved their game overall after they finished the program. (Though we wish they had chosen another sport for their study, as David Epstein's The Sports Gene revealed that supremely talented baseball players are usually blessed with laser-like vision.) The study's findings open up a wider argument for the plasticity of brain power, suggesting that through training exercises, we can improve our mental (and even physical) abilities. [LATimes

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