In case you hadn't noticed, vibrating technology is taking off in the fitness world.

(No, we're not talking about that kind of vibrating tech.)

We're talking about the fancy—and, yes, expensive—new foam rollers and wearable devices that are (literally) shaking up the industry of muscle recovery. But given the price tag (many cost at least $100), plenty of gym rats wonder: Do vibrating recovery tools really get the job done?

If new research is any indication, the answer might just be yes. Vibration therapy has been shown to significantly help reduce muscle soreness and creatine kinase (a blood marker that indicates muscle damage), while improving range of motion, according to new research published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology.

In the study, researchers had a group of 13 physically active men perform a series of strenuous arms exercises. (For the record, that's an extremely small sample size, so it's hard to draw extremely robust conclusions from the study.) Afterwards, the researchers applied 15 minutes of vibration therapy using tech from Myovolt, a New Zealand-based wearable technology company. The researchers applied the vibration to just one arm immediately after exercise, as well as 24, 48, and 72 hours later, and left the other arm completely alone.

The results? Applying vibration therapy immediately after exercise and in the short term significantly reduced muscle pain and improved range of motion, although it did not appear to affect muscle strength in the short or long term.

So if you're in the market for some new recovery tech, a vibrating foam roller—like the Grid Vibe from Trigger Point Therapy ($99.99) or the Vyper 2.0 from Hyperice ($199)—just might be worth the hefty price tag. But if you're on a budget, you can try one of the six best ways to recover from your workout or chow down on these eight recovery foods that won't undo your workout.