You may know him as the writer/director who left you scarred after watching one of his horrific independent films (like Cabin Fever, Hostel, or The Green Inferno) or as the skull-crushing Bear Jew in Inglorious Bastards.

But there's more to Eli Roth. "It was a life-changing experience," says Roth about the first time he held and kissed a shark, on a 2015 trip to the Bahamas. "My first time ever being around them, I instantly fell in love."

Today, an active shark conservationist and the host of Discovery Channel's Shark Week program Sharks After Dark, Roth says his goal on the show is to spread knowledge about sharks and promote conservation. He wants people to understand that sharks are peaceful animals that virtually never intend to attack humans, who aren't even part of their food chain.

We can't say the same about humans' appetites: Of the 100 million sharks, including endangered ones, killed by people each year, most are eaten. But many are harvested just for the squalene in their liver, a substance that's added to lipstick and lip balm to reduce the need for reapplication. And sharks don't wear lip balm.

"The same way that we're careful to only eat dolphin-safe tuna, we need to have awareness of shark-free makeup products," Roth says. "We all love shark porn. Great whites breaching and eating seals—it's awesome. But I want the show to be smart, and I want the viewers to feel smart for watching it."