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What Happens When You Drink an Energy Drink, According to This Random Site

We think it's what happens. Maybe? Why is a personalized gifts website publishing these things?

We're gonna go out on a limb here and guess that most people have a pretty reasonable idea of what happens to their bodies when they consume energy drinks.

Energy drinks cause a surge of energy. That, presumably, is why people buy and drink them. Okay? Okay.

But after a random "renegade pharmacist" stirred up a proverbial storm in the soda can with a chart explaining the effects of soda/pop on the body, it seems a random British site that specializes in personalized gifts has jumped on the explainer-chart bandwagon. The results are unsurprising, if not a little bewildering.


First off, we should note that the graphic doesn't cite any data backing up the biochemistry here. (Unless staffs biochemists—in which case, wow, way to go, guys.) But realistically speaking, nothing strikes us as too out-of-the-ordinary here: Caffeine takes about 20-30 minutes to take effect, and high amounts of sugar will cause glycemic spikes and crashes. Guys know this.

(We should, however, probably also note that caffeine isn't a radioactive isotope, so it doesn't actually have a half-life. That's just a figure of speech.)

And if you're looking for some expert opinions on the biochemistry of caffeine, take a look at some of our research:

Supplement Guide: Caffeine

How to Use Caffeine to Power Your Workout

Dangers of Coffee: Why Energy Drinks Could Be Jeopardizing Your Life

Are You Addicted to Caffeine?

Lastly, there's no need to single out Red Bull. And please take note: It's "Red Bull." Two words. Capital letters at the front. Thanks.


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