Easter—or as comedian John Oliver believes it should be called, “shitty Christmas”—is almost upon us with its pink ribbon-adorned baskets full of fake eggs, chocolate bunnies, and neon-green “grass.” The highlight of the day, if you’re lucky enough not to have to round up screaming kids trying to unearth plastic eggs scattered all over the yard, is opening up that big chocolate bunny—hopefully a solid one, and not a chintzy hollow deal—and taking a big bite out if it. But which part do you attack first? The head? A nibble on the toes? Or maybe the most efficient option: stuff those ears into your maw.

If you do hit up the ears first, you’re among the majority of Americans, says a new study from some ear, nose, and throat doctors at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. For the savory survey, the scientists looked to almost 30,000 Internet denizens to find out, in their words, about the popularity of “auricular amputations” around Easter on the unlucky rabbits. They searched terms like “chocolate,” “rabbit,” “Easter,” “ears,” and “amputation” from January 2012 to January 2017 to fill out their survey.

The researchers found that a full 59% of Easter bunny eaters went for the ears, 33% said they didn’t care and bit that bunny wherever felt good, and a tiny minority of 4% said they start nibbling on the tail or feet first. And, unsurprisingly, the study authors noted that there was little wholesale carnage and amputations related to other holiday treats. "It was interesting to discover that few other confectionary symbols, such as Santa, succumb to isolated defects, like the chocolate bunnies do," said lead study author Kathleen Yaremchuk, M.D.

If you do get into some chocolate this Easter, try to nosh on some dark chocolate with at least 70% cacao, which is loaded with antioxidants called flavonoids that can help prevent high blood pressure, improve blood flow to the brain, and keep arteries clear of clogging plaque, plus it's lower in sugar and calories.

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