The Oregon football team might need some relationship therapy before the season starts.

After three football players—offensive linemen Doug Brenner and Sam Poutasi, and tight end Cam McCormick—were hospitalized following “military” style workouts in practice, the school responded by suspending strength and conditioning coach Irele Oderinde without pay for a month.

But some players on the team responded a different way.

Junior wideout wide receiver Darren Carrington II, safety Mattrell McGraw, and linebacker Keith Simms blasted their teammates on Twitter, with Carrington calling out his teammates in a since-deleted tweet. “How do suspend a man for three players being out of shape?" Carrington wrote. "All I can say is wow!”

Carrington also defended his coach, writing that Oderinde is the “best strength coach” he’s ever had:

McGraw dropped a few lines about the situation, calling attention to the fact that the other “109” players were fine from the workouts:

 

 

Simms supported his coach with the hashtag “#FreeCoachO”:

Oregon head coach Willie Taggart released a statement about the situation: "I have visited with the three young men involved in the incidents in the past few days and I have been in constant contact with their families, offering my sincere apologies. As the head football coach, I hold myself responsible for all of our football-related activities and the safety of our students must come first. I have addressed the issue with our strength and conditioning staff, and I fully support the actions taken today by the university. I want to thank our medical staff and doctors for caring for all of our young men, and I want to apologize to the university, our students, alumni and fans."

Of the three players who were admitted to the hospital following the workouts, Brenner has been released, while McCormick and Poutasi remain as patients, according to ESPN. The Oregonian previously reported that Poutasi's mother said that her son had been diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis, which can cause the “body’s muscles break down to such an extent that their cells flood in the bloodstream and can lead to kidney failure,” Michele Olson, Ph.D., professor at Auburn University Montgomery, told Men's Fitness.

Find out more about rhabdomyolysis and 5 ways your workout can get ugly with this handy guide from Men’s Fitness.