Iceland’s having a baby boom—and it’s all due to the Icelandic national soccer team.

Nine months after Iceland sealed the biggest victory in national team history over England in the Euro 2016 tournament, the game is still having an impact on the country.

Dr. Asgeir Petur Thorvaldsson—who works in the anaesthesiology department at Landspitali University Hospital in Reykjavik—posted on Twitter that the weekend of March 25-26 "set a record for the number of epidurals in the maternity duty—nine months after the 2-1 win over England."

This isn’t the first time that a major victory by a sports team sparked some extra babymaking. Back in 2004, after the Boston Red Sox won the World Series for the first time in 86 years, The Boston Globe reported there was a major spike in births nine months after the championship.

Iceland, a nation of just 300,000 people, had never notched a win as big as the victory against England on the international stage. About 99.8% of TV viewers in Iceland watched the match, according to the BBC.

And—clearly—many of them took to the sheets to celebrate.