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Your Workouts Reviewed: Four Days of HIIT

Our experts assess a reader's custom high intensity interval training routine.

Everyone's got a workout of their own—your "go-to" routine. But is your routine good enough? We asked our Men's Fitness Facebook friends if they had a killer routine to share and subject to the scrutiny of our readers. The big catch? Our team of training experts also review it, critique it and tweak it if necessary.

Workout Submission

Glen Tither Men's Fitness Facebook Friend

"Since the intensity of these workouts is so intense, I always leave a day's rest and recovery in between." Day One: 1: wide press-up, squat thrust, diamond press-up, squat thrust - 15 reps 2: straight arm body plank with dirty dog knee to shoulder - 10 reps each side 3: jump reverse lunges - 20 reps each leg 4: body plank jacks - 20 reps Perform all of the above exercises one after the other. This equals 1 set; do 10 sets without rest. Should take about 20 minutes. Day Two: 1: burpee with press-up - 15 reps 2: punchbag straight punches - 40 reps 3: barbell front squats - 10 reps 4: pull-ups - 10 reps 5: skipping - 100 reps Perform all of the above exercises one after the other. This equals 1 set; do 10 sets without rest. Should take about 20 minutes. Day Three: 1: kettlebell squat & front swing - 20 reps 2: burpee with press-up - 15 reps 3: sandbag/gravelbag, overhead reverse lunges - 10 reps each leg 4: abdominal wheel roll out/ins - 10 reps Perform all of the above exercises one after the other. This equals 1 set; do 10 sets without rest. Should take about 20 minutes. Day Four: 1: sandbag ‘duck under’ squats - 10 reps each side 2: superman press-ups - 20 reps 3: alternate leg squat thrusts - 40 reps 4: pull-ups - 10 reps Perform all of the above exercises one after the other. This equals 1 set; do 10 sets without rest. Should take about 20 minutes.

Expert Assessment #1

Rob Sulaver C.S.C.S. is the owner and founder of BandanaTraining.com Follow Sulaver on Twitter @BandanaTraining

Pros: Variety. Damn challenging. Cons: First of all, this isn't high intensity interval training (which is traditionally on a piece of cardio equipment or the ground). This isn't even cardio-strength training (which incorporates rest intervals that allow the intensity of training to remain high.) Because you're doing 10 sets without rest, this would be more comparable to Maximal-Lactate Steady-State Exercise—which is the highest workload an exerciser can maintain for an extended period of time. This type of training is all good and great if you want to get awesome at exercising at a high intensity for a long period of time (a worthy, albeit challenging-as-shit, goal most applicable to cardio athletes). I have no problem with this type of training if it suits your goals. But if you want to get shredded, this isn't the smartest way to go about it. Comments: If you're going to do this type of training, I'd recommend starting with a more manageable number of sets (like five) and working your way up. This will give you a progression for the workout and will help keep your intensity high. Remember, the intent of this type of workout is to be able to exercise like a wildebeest the entire time.

Expert Assessment #2

Dan Trink C.S.C.S., CPT is the Director of Personal Training Operations at Peak Performance NYC and the trainer in our 8-Week Fitness Transformassacre Follow Trink on Twitter @TrinkFitness

Pros: Holy smokes! You have the ability to survive this? Your work capacity is clearly through the roof. Considering almost all these moves are total body, you actually manage to get in a great variety of movement patterns. And I'm not sure what a 'dirty dog knee to shoulder' is, but it sure sounds like a cool addition or variation. Cons: In my opinion, you are not using the term HIIT correctly. Intervals imply that there is a work period and a rest period. Your rest period seems to begin when you are collapsed on the floor once the training session is over. I can't imagine that you are using much load on any of these movements as the reps are just so high and the rest is non-existent. I admire your creativity, but training programs like this just come across as way too complicated. Stick with the basic movements and be great at them, even if you want to utilize them in a metabolic capacity. Comments: You're a gutsy, tough guy to make it through a program like this but I have to imagine you are sacrificing quality of movement, loads and strength in an effort to just get as much work done in as little time as possible. Consider designing or following a program that will make you stronger, bigger, leaner, faster or whatever your goal is and utilize true interval training as a part of that program. Your body will be better for it.

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