You're not the only one that gets bored to hell with the same routine—your muscles do too.

After months, or even years, of the same exercises day in and day out, you've done an outstanding job at holding your body back from its potential for next-level definition and hardness. You and your body are simply too accustomed to the same thing. We're creatures of habit with a tendency to follow the path of least resistance, or stick to the things we know. (Oh, look, there's that mind-muscle connection thing again). Everything's always the damn same. Squat, bench, dead, squat, bench, dead. You know it, we know it—they're the cornerstones.

But they're not the only exercises known to man. Step into advanced isolation training.

HOW IT WORKS

Your typical program consists of a big, compound exercise or exercises followed by isolation exercise, or exercises. For this particular approach, you're going to chill out on the big lifts and double-down on the little ones. Isolation exercises a great way to hyper-focus and zero in on one particular muscle, but they also help you tap into smaller, more discreet muscle fibers. While a barbell bench press is pounding your pectorials, a cable or dumbbell flye that'e executed from 10-12 slightly different angles is uncovering the fresh spots.

DIRECTIONS

For 2-3 weeks, couple up a large muscle group (legs, back, chest) with a smaller muscle group (shoulders, arms, abs) or a push and a pull. Shoot for 1 days rest between workouts. Cycle back onto your regular programming after the 2-3 weeks are up. Rest 30 seconds or less between sets.

THE WORKOUTS

In the videos: Eugene Isaev (@eugeneaesthetics) is an LA-based certifed personal trainer